carryonflareon:

misterrad:

The Myth of the Disrupted Classroom
When I was a Junior in high school, my girlfriend was sent home from school for wearing inappropriate clothing.  She was wearing layers of slips on top of each other that, together, broke no established rule of our dress code.  She was told by our principal, formerly the principal of a parochial girl’s school, that her dress was more appropriate “for a garden party,” and therefore inappropriate for learning.  She sat in the principal’s office and told the principal that she was being singled out because her clothes were weird, and because her clothes didn’t cost a lot of money.  She was offered a sweater to cover her arms and go back to class.  She refused.  She got into her gold Cadillac and drove home for the day.
I married that girl.  People should marry those kinds of girls when they find them, and if they can get those kinds of girls to fall for them.
Now I am a teacher.  I went into teaching to, of all things, teach.  I’m not sure I went into teaching to be a Teacher.  Being a Teacher feels like teaching, plus all the other stuff.  I learned a lot from great educators and mentors in my life.  I remember hating most of my Teachers.  I remember Teachers discussing the clothing of students and scoffing and “oh my god did you see”ing.  I say I don’t care what kids wear.  I remember Teachers talking about a disruption to learning.  
I can’t tell you how much I don’t care what anyone wears to school.
I can’t tell you how few times I’ve ever seen clothing of any kind disrupt class in any way.  In fact, let me say this:  I have never seen clothing of any kind disrupt class in any way.
I’ve certainly seen disruption, pretty massive disruption, caused by enforcing dress codes.  Students often, and understandably, react poorly to being told that clothes they have on or body parts they have make them inappropriate for school that day.  There are melt-downs, to be sure, and indignation.  There is yelling and arguing and many things that are massive disruptions to learning.  Sometimes kids go home for the whole day, which is a whole lot of learning not happening.
I’ve seen administrators enter active classrooms, walk around the room sticking their heads under desks to look at the length of skirts and shorts.  Really, in the real world, I’ve seen this.  I’ve seen girls asked to stand up in front of classes, looked up and down and then told, “yeah, I guess you’re ok.  Sit back down.”  I’ve watched administrators leave, and then cared for embarrassed, shamed, angry students.  I’ve seen whole hours and whole days of learning disrupted by enforcing dress codes, and that doesn’t take in to account the emotional damage done to students by a system that should be protecting them.
I’m certainly uncomfortable with the message we are sending.  Kids are self-conscious enough.  Girls especially have enough people commenting on how they look and holding them to an often impossible and moving target of appropriateness, attractiveness, and self expression.  I don’t like the message of a school telling someone that the clothes they put on their own bodies made them a problem for the whole school they attend, so much so that they need to go home, or cover up.  So much so that they need to feel shame.  Shame disrupts learning more than skirts.  I promise.
We’re more comfortable confronting the girl wearing the thing, and not the boys who say the things about her.  We are comfortable putting the blame for the actions of boys onto the girls around them.
We are no one to say what is right or wrong, appropriate or not.  We are no one to say how kids should act or dress or what jobs they should wish for or what friends they should have.  We should give them all the information we have, any information that will help keep them safe and successful and sane, and then we should let them make their own choices.
Schools are not moral authorities.  When we create judgement calls about things like appropriate or not, acceptable or not, we leave room for each teacher and administrator to judge a student against their own moral code.  When we enforce dress codes, we leave room for every staff member to address students that make them feel uncomfortable.
To be honest, I’m not sure why we act as authorities at all.  As a school, we offer something so precious and so valuable.  We offer the skills and ideas, we offer a path to success.  So why do we spend so much time tracking tardies, enforcing behavior and dress codes, demanding silence and a level of respect that is reverential at best and fear-based at worst.
Anyone who knows enough teenagers knows that the more rules you give them that don’t make sense, the happier they will be doing the opposite of what you tell them.  The more you shake your head and act stern, the more they will see you as someone to disobey.
We have this phenomenal power as teachers, as workers in schools.  We control this massive amount of time students are required to be with us.  We control their grades, their access to opportunities, the experience of many years of their lives.  We control great portions of their self image, of their confidence, of their skill levels.
We don’t need to grab any more power than we already have.  We don’t need to feel like we have to control every single thing to maintain the power we already have.  We have important things to do all day.  We don’t need to spend time on other stuff.

Out of all the teachers I have ever had, this man has always been my favorite. 

carryonflareon:

misterrad:

The Myth of the Disrupted Classroom

When I was a Junior in high school, my girlfriend was sent home from school for wearing inappropriate clothing.  She was wearing layers of slips on top of each other that, together, broke no established rule of our dress code.  She was told by our principal, formerly the principal of a parochial girl’s school, that her dress was more appropriate “for a garden party,” and therefore inappropriate for learning.  She sat in the principal’s office and told the principal that she was being singled out because her clothes were weird, and because her clothes didn’t cost a lot of money.  She was offered a sweater to cover her arms and go back to class.  She refused.  She got into her gold Cadillac and drove home for the day.

I married that girl.  People should marry those kinds of girls when they find them, and if they can get those kinds of girls to fall for them.

Now I am a teacher.  I went into teaching to, of all things, teach.  I’m not sure I went into teaching to be a Teacher.  Being a Teacher feels like teaching, plus all the other stuff.  I learned a lot from great educators and mentors in my life.  I remember hating most of my Teachers.  I remember Teachers discussing the clothing of students and scoffing and “oh my god did you see”ing.  I say I don’t care what kids wear.  I remember Teachers talking about a disruption to learning.  

I can’t tell you how much I don’t care what anyone wears to school.

I can’t tell you how few times I’ve ever seen clothing of any kind disrupt class in any way.  In fact, let me say this:  I have never seen clothing of any kind disrupt class in any way.

I’ve certainly seen disruption, pretty massive disruption, caused by enforcing dress codes.  Students often, and understandably, react poorly to being told that clothes they have on or body parts they have make them inappropriate for school that day.  There are melt-downs, to be sure, and indignation.  There is yelling and arguing and many things that are massive disruptions to learning.  Sometimes kids go home for the whole day, which is a whole lot of learning not happening.

I’ve seen administrators enter active classrooms, walk around the room sticking their heads under desks to look at the length of skirts and shorts.  Really, in the real world, I’ve seen this.  I’ve seen girls asked to stand up in front of classes, looked up and down and then told, “yeah, I guess you’re ok.  Sit back down.”  I’ve watched administrators leave, and then cared for embarrassed, shamed, angry students.  I’ve seen whole hours and whole days of learning disrupted by enforcing dress codes, and that doesn’t take in to account the emotional damage done to students by a system that should be protecting them.

I’m certainly uncomfortable with the message we are sending.  Kids are self-conscious enough.  Girls especially have enough people commenting on how they look and holding them to an often impossible and moving target of appropriateness, attractiveness, and self expression.  I don’t like the message of a school telling someone that the clothes they put on their own bodies made them a problem for the whole school they attend, so much so that they need to go home, or cover up.  So much so that they need to feel shame.  Shame disrupts learning more than skirts.  I promise.

We’re more comfortable confronting the girl wearing the thing, and not the boys who say the things about her.  We are comfortable putting the blame for the actions of boys onto the girls around them.

We are no one to say what is right or wrong, appropriate or not.  We are no one to say how kids should act or dress or what jobs they should wish for or what friends they should have.  We should give them all the information we have, any information that will help keep them safe and successful and sane, and then we should let them make their own choices.

Schools are not moral authorities.  When we create judgement calls about things like appropriate or not, acceptable or not, we leave room for each teacher and administrator to judge a student against their own moral code.  When we enforce dress codes, we leave room for every staff member to address students that make them feel uncomfortable.

To be honest, I’m not sure why we act as authorities at all.  As a school, we offer something so precious and so valuable.  We offer the skills and ideas, we offer a path to success.  So why do we spend so much time tracking tardies, enforcing behavior and dress codes, demanding silence and a level of respect that is reverential at best and fear-based at worst.

Anyone who knows enough teenagers knows that the more rules you give them that don’t make sense, the happier they will be doing the opposite of what you tell them.  The more you shake your head and act stern, the more they will see you as someone to disobey.

We have this phenomenal power as teachers, as workers in schools.  We control this massive amount of time students are required to be with us.  We control their grades, their access to opportunities, the experience of many years of their lives.  We control great portions of their self image, of their confidence, of their skill levels.

We don’t need to grab any more power than we already have.  We don’t need to feel like we have to control every single thing to maintain the power we already have.  We have important things to do all day.  We don’t need to spend time on other stuff.

Out of all the teachers I have ever had, this man has always been my favorite. 

(via twofacedpsycho)

followandreblog:

Artist: Katarzyna Babis
Source: x

(via sisterofsilence)

glockgal:

madlori:

Women firefighters douse flames during the Pearl Harbor attack.

Oh hay look women of colour were an integral part of the ‘cool’ part of history too, how about that.  They were like. Doing stuff that supposedly only heroic white dudes had done. That makes women valid participants in collective history now, right? Right? This is in high school history books now, right? Right? Huh?

glockgal:

madlori:

Women firefighters douse flames during the Pearl Harbor attack.

Oh hay look women of colour were an integral part of the ‘cool’ part of history too, how about that.  They were like. Doing stuff that supposedly only heroic white dudes had done. That makes women valid participants in collective history now, right? Right? This is in high school history books now, right? Right? Huh?

(via becauseiamawoman)

betta-fish-and-loki:

assbutt-wizard-in-the-tardis:

I’m not even in this fandom, but hearing this made me feel so much better about life

I needed this today.

(via betsumei)

There’s no point to a guy yelling, “Hey sexy baby” at me out of the passenger window of a car as it speeds past. Even if I was into creepy misogynists and wanted to give him my number, I couldn’t. The car didn’t even slow down. But that’s okay, because he wasn’t actually hitting on me. The point wasn’t to proposition me or chat me up. The only point was to remind me, and all women, that our bodies are his to stare at, assess, comment on, even touch. “Hey sexy baby” is the first part of a sentence that finishes, “this is your daily message from the patriarchy, reminding you that your body is public property”. My First Name Ain’t Baby: ‘Hey Baby’ and Street Harassment (via official-mens-frights-activist)

(via becauseiamawoman)

cruelvalentine:

americachavez:

William H. Foster III, comic book historian, on representation in comic books. From PBS’s Superheroes: A Never-Ending Battle.

Because a post crossed my dash recently asking why we need to push for more representation in comic books and media in general. 50 years later, this man still tears up because in one panel, Peter Parker spoke to an unnamed black kid. That’s why we need representation.

Weepy.

(via softdomme)

afunnyfeminist:

alafindumonde:

thecuckoohaslanded:

earthlydreams:

feminismisatrick:

misanthrpologie:

Saving Face (2012), acid attacks on women in Pakistan

Meanwhile, in America, feminists are complaining about how dress codes are oppressive.

You idiots have never experienced oppression, and pray you never do, because this is what it looks like.

As a South Asian American feminist, let me remind everyone that oppression is not a competition.

Just because we fight one type of sexism doesn’t mean we don’t care about other instances of sexism that don’t affect us directly in our day to day lives.

My heart goes out to this woman and the hundreds of other victims like her. I want to educate people about these kinds of incidents. I support organizations that help women like this.

You may think that dress code issues are trivial, but they are related to a larger issue of women’s bodily autonomy, which affects women’s health and safety.

So please, let’s try to bring awareness and bring about change instead of insulting entire groups of people because they are facing issues that are less scary than the one presented.

oppression is not a competition

thank you so much for this wording

Reblogging again because reasons.

I’ve always thought comments like feminismisatrick’s to be vaguely threatening. They’re basically saying we should be satisfied with adults sexualizing our girls, because they could easily be throwing acid in our faces. I’d like to wear what I want and not have to worry about getting acid thrown in my face. Men get to.

(via femme-stardust)

pizzayacht:

peacepotandmicrodot:

lati-negros:

feminist77:

Pretty sure I already reblogged this but what the hell.  Love this campaign.  

campaign bringing awareness to homeless youth

I adore this campaign so much.

Okay just going to inform people about being young and homeless for a second

In most states, it is a status offense to run away from home, and in most states your parents can drag you home kicking and screaming.

46% leave because of physical abuse.

17% leave because of sexual abuse.

50% of homeless youth were kicked out, or their parent/guardian didn’t care/try to stop them when they left.

40% of the homeless in America are under 18.

Okay, so obviously in trying to fix homelessness, fixing youth homelessness is very important. But our society is completely restricting of youth being independent. A youth who is unhappy at home has very few options.

A youth is restricted from getting jobs without parental permission (and of course few homeless teens can get that). Without the option of getting a legal job, youth are forced into prostitution (survival sex), drug selling, and theft.

A yout cannot rent an apartment without parental permission.

Most hotels and motels will not let somebody under 18 book a room.

A youth cannot even get medical help without parental permission (even if they could afford it).

To house a homeless youth for more than 24 hours is a felony.

To aid a homeless youth in finding housing (besides a homeless shelter or their parent’s/guardian’s residence) is illegal.

Even shelters place 48 hour restrictions on youth without parental permission.

40% of homeless youth are LGBTQ.

Our misguided belief that these restrictions help youth- that these kids will go home and all will be well- is naive and harmful. It is ridiculous that we place parental rights and our notion that kids shouldn’t leave their parents above youth safety.

(via borospaladin)

bookshop:

teiledesganzen:

ronstormer:

effinglioness:

ninjabrianhasanstd:

mortallyfoolish:

Elle Woods was hollering back before the movement. This is why i love this movie. It’s so progressive. Elle is a femme feminist who comes by it the hard way. She doesn’t change for the bookish people, the elitists, or for the feminists. She just does what she needs to do, and what she wants, even when at first it was chasing a boy. Then the movie drops the romance. IT DROPS THE ROMANCE. chick flicks don’t do that. Emmett asking her out is a footnote at the very end. And this whole time, she is classy, and lady like, and has pride in herself and her work. She’ll go to a costume party as a playboy bunny, but like hell will she sleep with her professor for an internship. Elle is my feminist role model

Same.

Elle Woods 4ever

I remember listening to my DAD defend Legally Blonde. An uncle was saying “Oh look, it’s that stupid movie again.” as he flipped through the channels. My dad responded with “Oh yeah, that movie where the blonde girl with great grades works really hard to get into pre-law, studies hard and proves herself to her peers and bosses while maintaining her integrity and not sleeping with her boss? What a terrible message to send girls.”

Also, I love this movie because Reese Witherspoon. 

And don’t forget that she has serious female friends and wins the case by way of her specialist knowledge of so-called “feminine things” that no one else takes seriously enough to even bother with.

The movie also passes the Bechdel test.

LET’S NOT FORGET that even though it starts with a situation where two girls are rivals for the same guy, they BOTH choose to ignore the social codes (and hollywood bylaws) that tell them they should be cat-fighting and trying to one-up each other, and instead they realize that they make good working partners and better friends and screw rivalry, AND ALSO HAVE EACH OTHER’S BACKS RE: WORKPLACE SEXUAL HARASSMENT. And that it portrays sororities as places where women can learn to work together and respect each other and help each other out, which sets the stage for the way Elle treats everyone she meets for the rest of the movie. OH AND IT HAS A FAT SIDE CHARACTER WHO OVERCOMES EMOTIONAL ABUSE, IS NEVER FAT-SHAMED OR USED AS THE BRUNT OF A FAT JOKE, AND LANDS THE HOTTEST MAN IN THE ENTIRE FILM. 

(via hymnofthefaith)